1. Interview#50 Maisie Cousins

    How old are you?
    21

    Where are you from?
    London UK

    What kind of photographic equipment do you use?
    A digital slr camera, lots of different lenses, a film point and shoot and any lighting I can get my hands on.

    What do you do when you are not shooting?
    I’m painting a lot again at the moment it’s very calming. I cook loads and do a lot of laying on the floor with friends. I like mooching around and having no job.

    What was the first photograph you were proud of?
    To be honest I’m not really that proud of any of my work. Not that I don’t like my images, I always like my images but I don’t see them as much of an achievement. Maybe because I enjoy doing it so much it doesn’t seem like hard work.

    How much preparation is there behind your photographs?
    I never pre plan certain shots, I like the fluidity of just going with the flow and creating work naturally, however I will buy props and think about locations weeks before shoots. I might try out properly planning my shoots soon just to spice things up.

    Have you ever done sacrifices or compromises as a photographer?
    I’m sure I have but I have a selective memory.

    What is your safe place?
    My parents house probably. I like to be in bed under so many blankets I can’t move!

    Do you have any obsessions?
    Oh gosh I’m obsessed with everything. I think food is a big obsession of mine. I love knowing peoples favourite foods I think it says a lot about someone. I have quite intense phases of what I’m into, its ever changing I havn’t found the one obsession just yet!

    Is there an artist you’ll gladly collaborate with or that you regard with esteem?
    I want to collaborate with anyone who just gets the need to make things to be happy. I don’t care what your ideas are as long as you have an energy and a positivity and a sense of humour.

    ▶ How your experience with Tart have influenced your photography, in your opinion?
    I’ve only just started Tart properly to be honest. It probably looks like I’m only showcasing stuff that looks like my own work, I’m building its aesthetic first, then I will branch and be more brave!

    [If you want to see more, find her on maisie-cousins.tumblr.com]

     

  2. Don’t miss Maisie Cousins' interview on Redox the 19th of July!

    (via maisie-cousins)

     

  3. redoxmagazine:

    Interview#14 Nicotiniac

    How old are you?
    I am about 64 and three quarters years old. Or maybe older. I feel much older.

    Where are you from?
    I am from Lambeth, in south London, England. I was born there at the end of the second world war and came back in 1984, and stayed there ever since. It is a messy, angry and sometimes violent place and it suits me fine.

    What kind of photographic equipment do you use?
    I have two old Olympus 35mm slrs and I borrow digital cameras from other people. I develop films in my kitchen, and scan them in.

    What do you do when you are not shooting?
    I try to keep moving around and seeing new things, but too often I just eat and drink and get fat and drunk. I work like a slave for a bookseller for hardly any money and I write shit for various companies sometimes.

    What was the first photograph you were proud of?
    Photos of punks and hippies and rudeboys in the trees at a Victoria Park free concert in 1978, but I lost the negatives. I loved taking photos from age 11, thought i was a mini-cartier-bresson but no-one else agreed so i stopped for about 20 years. I tried to write but generally failed. So I came back to photography and found this digital age much more accepting.

    How much preparation is there behind your photographs?
    Not much. I just wait for the right light. And the right body-weight. (joke). Only recently have I started in despair to use paint etc…. .

    Have you ever done sacrifices or compromises as a photographer?
    Sometimes I think yes, because if my family and friends knew what i was doing they would think I am mad. But then I am mad. So really, I just wait and watch. It’s no real sacrifice - in fact, it’s the reverse, because i get to meet beautiful artists like you. As for compromises - yes! Every photo is a pale shadow of what I really want to do. But if I did what i really wanted to do I would be burned at the stake.

    What is your safe place?
    Naked on the floor of my apartment. Or lurking in the shadows of a charity shop in west London.

    Do you have any obsessions?
    Too many, where do I start? Bob Dylan? Vinyl? Italian cofffee? italy? Italians? Books? Penguin classics? Bicycles? Paint. Ink. Paper. Red wine. Old Holborn. 35mm Film. 120 film. Etc, etc etc etc.

    Is there an artist you’ll gladly collaborate with or that you regard with esteem?
    First and foremost, you. Honestly I’d love to collaborate with any artist whose work I’ve adored on these various websites, but I think they would prefer to keep some distance.

    ▶Your body is the raw material used in your photos: sometimes it is evanescent, sometimes it is sharp. Do you think there is a narcissistic component in being your own main subject?
    I think what I do is totally narcissist. I know it dates back to when I was a fat little boy at school and was mocked and teased. I hid myself away for a long time. I began to want to disappear. I looked at books which had the first photos from the concentration camps - the emaciated corpses, piled up. It was sickening, obscene. What those governments did was the obscenity, meanwhile people I admired - the editors of Oz magazine, for example - were being prosecuted for obscenity for allowing schoolchildren to discuss sex and other matters in their magazine. Around the same time I started to learn about art and saw what an amazingly beautiful, vulnerable, hard, soft, frightening, adorable thing the human body is - thinking Masaccio, Grunewald, thinking of Picasso, of Goya, of Rodin, of Munch and Schiele, of Giacommetti. Of Mapplethorpe.
    Now I am old, I have nothing more to lose, I want to bring all these thoughts to the surface. I started to capture what is left, chronicle the changes in my own body. I am fascinated at this ageing process, the way skin stretches over bone, over fat, over wasted muscle. I would love to photograph others as well, but I never had the nerve to ask anyone. And my own body seems to offer plenty of different angles and surprises, more than enough to keep me busy in the limited time i have. Thanks so much, Redox, for taking an interest, I am in your debt.

    [If you want to see more, find him on nicotiniac.deviantart.com]

     

  4. redoxmagazine:

    Special Issue #4: Identity by Francesco Paolo Catalano

    Written by Claudia Puddu

    The body, according to Pierre Bordieu (French sociologist and philosopher) is the mediator between us and the world; however, it is not that only the flesh has a a predominant role in the making of our identity, but also other people’s judgements, behaviours and values contribute to the internalisation of the image of ourselves. Building our identity is always an ongoing process that changes constantly thanks to cultural influences, which model the perception of our identity through categorisations such as clothes, body painting, diets, genital surgery and so on. The concept of identity is at the heart of Francesco Paolo Catalano’s work which finds a natural place in his psychological and anthropological background. His work focuses on the thousand of aspects owned by every human being and he tries to go beyond the severe dichotomy of the cisgender world. In fact our social habits confine us into very restrictive boundaries (for example the stereotypical view boy/girl that influence us since our childhood). The concept of Identity is often bound to the concept of social role, gender or sexual orientation and is the main theme of four projects: “Aged”, “Copy”, “Identity Is A Cube” and Twins. Each project crosses with the other one and they all aim to explore the concept of Identity linked to the body, to the differences between reality and its artificial copy and to a vision of the identity as a social mirror and not just as a biological representation. Francesco Paolo Catalano chooses an aesthetical approach which is inspired by cinema, theatre and in some way he recalls a photographical realism; he also chooses a formal approach inspired by the conceptual art of the 60’s and the Queer Culture. His stylistic research is summarized by its Queer component; with this word we are not just implying a resemblance between Catalano’s work and LGBT’s most important topics, but we are using it to underline all the efforts that we daily do in order to overcome social labels. Looking at the work that Catalano has given to us, we can see how Identity is defined through physical, psychological, social, aesthetic and ethnic changes, through a comparison with each others in order to define not just ourselves but also the others, and also through a constant mental work that helps an individual identifying the connections between forms and shapes, asking himself about his perception of reality and consequently of the identity. Identity is like the Rubik’s cube, constantly dismantled and deconstructed. Catalano doesn’t aim to give answers to us, but he wants to put us in front of the multiplicity of the individual, stimulating the dynamical interaction of the immagination and a sort of right thinking in order to rip apart all the stricts dichotomies.

    ­ What was your first approach to photography ad how would you define your artistic path?
    When I was a student, I used to take a lot of breaks from studying in order to remember things, and in those breaks I started making self- portraits. Over the years, this space-time full of energy increased and my face became a mask and and a key to understanding. Acne was over and there were mirrors again in my bathroom. One day when I was at the University I ran away from there and I sat inside a wardrobe. I saw my double with the back of my neck without hair. They say that mirrors are doors. My photography started inside a wardrobe to remember me the pleasure of drawing and playing without the need of looking for an explanation. Lonely and invented games, like using a yarn of cotton with a needle for sewing, pretending it is a head of hair waiting to be dressed up for the scene. When I’m not drawing eyes and eyebrows on paper or on faces and when I have no one to observe, I use the camera to broadcast a fake icon. I consider my artistic path as the scene from "The Wizard of Oz" where it’s revealed his identity: let’s uncover everything and let’s do that during Christmas dinner, we don’t need to wait for Carnival to have confettis. An orange basket for toys it’s my childhood cell and my psychological setting as an adult. I still have the folder with all my pre-school drawings. Recently I started to edit them. It was all there from the beginning: women, trees, a widespread light like a windmill.

    How much has your identity as a sicilian influenced aesthetically your photography?
    I don’t know Sicily very well. I feel nearer to my experience the state of the rite of passage and the one of a foreign who doesn’t like the idea of the sun as a way of socializing and aesthetic wealth. I can’t do a lot of “sicilian” things like cooking well, swimming and be “physical”: I often bring these variable in photography. I contextualize and de-contextualize, locate and globalize to isolate the relations of environments and transpose them on a more psychological than geographic dimension. My sicilian education is very tied to my first wig, which I found at home, and a picture of my mother as a young girl. In the 70’s women used to wear wigs to go to parties. In the 90’s I changed the hairdo to that wig and I put make up on its polystyrene face.

    Your photos are suggestions and reflections about the concepts of identity: do they aim to challenge the viewer or yourself?
    Before I could describe identity through images I have waited to know myself and to have my teenager insecurity overcomed, but while I waited to “speak” I took notes of everything just like a child before he says his first word. “Is it you in that picture?”; “What do your parents say about these picture?”;”You shoot unusual photographs”; “I thought you were more feminine in person”, etcetera. These questions, often spoken in casual situations, are the reason why I use the codes of identity representation of transvestism and the virtual channels to communicate. My priority is to interrupt the closed cycle of certainties based on the dichotomic duos like male/female; real/virtual; finite/infinite. I’m not interested in shocking anyone, rather than that I put the focus on the cultural relativism and the social stereotypes of western society. Warhol’s “yes” and “no” are now just “likes”.

    Your series “Aged”, “Identity is a cube" and "Twins" deal with identity as a change or a physical connotation; consequently, they highlight how identity is defined by an external point of view. Do you think that, compared to a project like "Copy”, the role of the viewer is just to establish the differences and then more passive?
    Identity is a comparison and it’s transverse to every attribution of a meaning. These three series are three “paradigm” crossed like the trails of the labyrinth from “Orland: A Biography" (V. Woolf). A labyrinth as a never objective experience, but emotional instead, where a single physical path reveals expectations and motivations that no directors can control. The labyrinth is my Rubik’s Cube: you can find pleasure in shifting the colors of the squares without necessarily finding a solution even if you don’t know the mathematical rules of the mechanism. "Copy" is a project without a deadline of time and I will wait for someone to show me some of his items or views in order to create new reflection of identity.

    Unlike the other projects about identity, “Copy" is a more conceptual work that needs the viewer to make connections between one form and the other. How much influence had the concept art of the 60’s ("One and Three Chairs" of Joseph Kosuth, for example)?
    The everyday objects of Joseph Kosuth follow the same “conceptual direction” of “Copy”: to find synonyms and multiple meaning of perception. The idea of modeling clay, carbon paper, camouflage and the search of similarities and obsessions. I shift the platonic model to a psychological model of transference and countertransference. Cindy Sherman’s body experienced as an object to redress of perceptive symbolism and cultural standardization, completed of the communicative paradox unveiled by Paul Watzlawick, has the meaning of proceeding with the steps of a schizophrenic.

    What is that makes your photography “Queer”?
    The Queer Culture at first was a concept from a sociological point of view, but now it has become a visual art situated, in some way, in a recent past. “Queer" was the subject of my graduation thesis and later the translation in images of words researches. "Queer" is that familiar term that I put later on a photo such as .JPG o .TIFF, intended as the overcoming of the idea of categories and the awareness of the social difficulties using the queer philosophy. I might say that "Queer" is friend of mine, a muse named Patty Owens, which I have created on film, or the passage revealed by the mistakes of many portraits. Queer is the reason why I have started taking pictures: tell the world that there are children who use sweaters on their heads in order to imagine themselves with log hairs in summers’ afternoon.

    [If you want to see more, find him on francescopaolocatalano.tumblr.com]

    [ Find here the Italian version]

     

  5. redoxmagazine:

    Interview#8 highcastle

    How old are you?
    I’m 37 year old .

    Where are you from?
    I originally am from Austin, Texas.

    What kind of photographic equipment do you use?
    I use a mix of digital and film cameras. Currently I use a Fujifilm Instax Wide camera as well as a Canon ae-1 35mm and a variety of plastic cameras and medium format cameras. At any time I use as many as ten cameras to get what I want. Each camera has a different personality, so I use them accordingly.

    What do you do when you are not shooting?
    I’m a film geek, so I spend most of my time immersing myself in cinema. I have a day job that pays the rent and allows me to focus my brain on creating my photographs.

    What was the first photograph you were proud of?
    I’m not really sure. A photograph is simultaneously a way to capture a moment in time forever as well as a way to create an alternate reality. These realities become self contained, they become separate from our time stream and become a continuation of a greater story. So in a way, its all the same story, all the same photograph. I cant really explain it further in a way that makes sense, I suppose. I can say that when I worked with Nettie Harris to create my homage to Catherine Breillat’s film, “A real young girl”, I felt that I’d turned a corner.

    How much preparation is there behind your photographs?
    It varies from photograph to photograph. Sometimes I have a very specific concept in mind, and I can spend months talking with my subject (model) about it. Other times, we just shoot from the hip, and it becomes very instinctive.

    Have you ever done sacrifices or compromises as a photographer?
    I think we all have done such things, for friends, or what have you, but the older I get, the less I’m willing to compromise. I know exactly what I want and I look for people who will help me to get that image. I know that the nature of my work discourages most from working with me, but that helps me to weed out ineffectual collaborators and allows me to work with courageous or at the very least, open subjects.

    What is your safe place?
    I could go to the movies every single day. It is my greatest source of inspiration besides the women that I work with. To be immersed in cinema is heaven for me.

    Do you have any obsessions?
    I don’t really drink, smoke, do drugs or any of that. I enjoy life, living it, I love my wife, the creative freedom that she gives me. I’m obsessed with film, obviously, and sex and women, but I find a beauty in that, and it’s my goal to change the way that we see sex. I don’t think it’s a sacred thing nor do I think it is profane. It’s somewhere in the middle, and I hope to find the honesty and beauty in that. That’s my obsession.

    Is there an artist you’ll gladly collaborate with or that you regard with esteem?
    It is my sincerest goal to work with my muse, Cam Damage, as often as I can. She’s one of the very few who truly understands me or gets what I want, or could give me what I want, for that matter. As for other artists, I actually work with blinders on as much as possible. If anything, if possible, I’d work with filmmakers and cinematographers. Haskell Wexler and Ben Kasulke, cinematographers here in the States, have inspired me greatly, so it would be a dream to work with them.

    ▶Your photographs show a very deep and intimate connection between the subject and the photographer; has it ever happened to you that one of the women used as models misinterpreted your work? Or has complained after seeing your pictures?
    Of course, my work isn’t for everyone. Sometimes there is an intimacy that happens between models. Three of the most important relationships in my life would never have happened had there not been some kind of intimacy between myself and my subject. Sometimes women think they want to be a part of this and do not realize the immense emotional toll that such work can exact on you. Generally, people who aren’t suited to what I do weed themselves out before hand, but at the end of the day, that’s what model releases are for. I also rarely work alone, especially when I’m working with someone new. Ultimately, I’d like to build a core group of women that I work with consistently, similar to the way people like Wes Anderson, Tim Burton, and Martin Scorsese do as filmmakers. You build trust and intimacy and subsequently the work becomes superior.

    [If you want to see more, find him on highcastle.tumblr.com]

     

  6. redoxmagazine:

    Interview#1 Vivian Fu

    How old are you?
    I am 22 years old.

    Where are you from?
    I was born in Los Angeles.

    What kind of photographic equipment do you use?
    I use a variety of different analog cameras.

    What do you do when you are not shooting?
    I am working at my job, grocery shopping, thinking about how I should go outside more, spending time with my boyfriend, bothering the people I live with.

    What was the first photograph you were proud of?
    The first photograph that I took that I was proud of is probably a picture of my roommate and his boyfriend at the time kissing in the shower when we were all still living in the dorms at school.

    How much preparation is there behind your photographs?
    Very little to no preparation.

    Have you ever done sacrifices or compromises as a photographer?
    I don’t think that I have ever had to make sacrifices or compromises as a photographer. I take pictures for myself, so I don’t really have to consider what other people want because at the moment, it’s entirely about what I want.

    What is your safe place?
    My bed or anywhere with my partner.

    Do you have any obsessions?
    I’m obsessed with cheeseburgers right now.

    Is there an artist you’ll gladly collaborate with or that you regard with esteem?
    There are a lot of artists who are making work that I think is really wonderful and great that I would love to collaborate with. I am already collaborating with some of these artists. There are really too many to name!

    ▶ Is your photography breaking in your personal life or the opposite?
    I photograph my private life, so in that regard my private life influences my photography, but my photography doesn’t interfere with my private life because I can choose to not photograph certain moments.

    [If you want to see more, find her on vivian-fu.tumblr.com]

     


  7. Little summer break + some old goodies!

    Hi everyone! How is your summer doing so far? Here at Redox it’s been really chaotic and exciting because of our one year anniversary, and in addition to that we are in the middle of our final exams for the degree, so we thought that this could be the perfect time to take a couple of weeks off, finish our things and come back cooler than ever. But you won’t be alone: we will post some old but great interviews that maybe you missed out, and we won’t stop reading and reviewing all your submission and request. By the way, we are considering the idea of looking for new collaborators, in more than one field, so if you are interested or just curious send us an email!
    Love you all,
    Redox

     

  8. Interview#49 Kim Björk

    How old are you?
    22 years old.

    Where are you from?
    Malmö, Sweden.

    What kind of photographic equipment do you use?
    Bronica SQ-A , Pentax 6x7 and a Nikon F.

    What do you do when you are not shooting?
    Read books, listen to music, drink

    What was the first photograph you were proud of?
    A recent photograph I took of my dogs.

    How much preparation is there behind your photographs?
    Not much, I just have an idea in my head and take it as it comes.

    Have you ever done sacrifices or compromises as a photographer?
    Not yet but I will be moving to Canada in July if everything works out.

    What is your safe place?
    At a bar.

    Do you have any obsessions?
    Buying cameras that I don’t need.

    Is there an artist you’ll gladly collaborate with or that you regard with esteem?
    Ivan Fucich.

    ▶Do you think that your photography may be related to some painting aesthetic?
    No idea, haven’t really thought about it./p>

    [If you want to see more, find him on kimbjork.com]

     

  9. Don’t miss Kim Bjork's interview on Redox the 5th of June!

     


  10. Hello everyone, this is the moment!
    Here are the winners of our very first giveaway:
    Tak Beru
    Claudia Puddu
    Loretta Fioroni
    Cintamani Puddu
    Lavinia Cerrone
    silencepj
    pasolla2
    big-time-sensuality
    dochnix
    albumontem
    realityandwitches
    jaejinwang
    wyoh

    We hope you will enjoy our little gift and will keep following our work and the photographers we are so lucky to interview. Love, Redox